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The term “political economy” is more or less synonymous with “economy” in our contemporary lexicon: both designate the distribution of goods and services under a certain political regime—be it capitalist, feudal, or communist—along with all the regulations, laws, and conventions governing such distribution. According to Aristotle, however, “economy” is the way to arrange things within a household (“” means “house”), and “politics” is the way to arrange things households—between “” or citizens, within the polis. So political economy combines both things. At some point in the late nineteenth century, the adjective “political” was dropped in English-language writing, and we ended up with simply “economy.” In one of the first studies of the economy of art—a book called published in 1857—the critic John Ruskin laments the confusion regarding the interpretation of the word “economy,” emphasizing that economy does not automatically imply money, frugality, or expenditures, but rather taking care of a household and managing labor. This would later becomes an important point in Hannah Arendt’s analysis of work and labor in the Human Condition.

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The Economic Contribution of Arts and Culture

The Economic Contribution of Arts and Culture – A CFCP Online Debate

All this week The Centre For Creative Practices are holding an online a discussion / debate about the economic contribution of arts and culture.

The week will include: webinars, blog posts, Twitter Feeds, group discussion and videos on how economic strategists, arts professionals, artists and arts organisations see this economic contribution. Is it sustainable? is it relevant or should we be concentrating of creativity and engagement more than economic contribution?

Get involved, use the hashtag #artseconomyire on Twitter or Facebook and lets get this discussion out there. It’s one we need to have and this is your chance to get involved.

Follow the debate online by clicking here >>


Platform 1 - Hints & Tips on Artistic Entrepreneurship

About Platform 1 from CFCP

As part of our artistic entrepreneurship programme we have introduced Platform 1, where each day we will post a snippet of information that we think might be of interest to you and to us.

Please feel free to comment, share, post your own suggestions or snippets as together we can build a repository of information that can benefit everyone on the journey.

Why Platform 1, well every journey has to start somewhere and every station has a platform 1, our departure point.

For more hints & tips see: http://cfcp.ie/platform-1/